LifeWorks Today! https://www.lifeworksystems.com/category/podcast/ Learn how to communicate and interact better with others so you can have a happy, meaningful, abundant life — personally and professionally Mon, 15 Feb 2021 18:04:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.6.2 We’re here to help you learn what you may not know, so you can understand yourself and others in new ways and RELAX -- whether at work, in your home, or in the community. You’ll feel great about yourself and your place in the world through new understandings. You’ll see ways to make your life work -- personally and professionally. You’ll gain peace and empowerment. We bring you new concepts and tools -- based in applied behavioral sciences -- so your LifeWorks Today! Judy Ryan clean episodic Judy Ryan judy@lifeworksystems.com judy@lifeworksystems.com (Judy Ryan) Copyright 2020. Lifework Systems To create a world in which all people love their lives LifeWorks Today! https://www.lifeworksystems.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/LifeWorks_Podcast_Logo_-_1400x1400.png https://www.lifeworksystems.com/category/podcast/ TV-G Episode 9 – Why Agile Transformations Fail https://www.lifeworksystems.com/whyagiletransformationsfail/ Mon, 14 Dec 2020 21:25:50 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=12312 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/whyagiletransformationsfail/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/whyagiletransformationsfail/feed/ 0 In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them to do. In this episode, Judy and her guest, Tara Gregor, founder and CEO of Breakwell, a resource hub for holistic wellness discuss a very different and highly effective approach to motivation. Old models and external motivation tactics simply don't work anymore. So, if those don't work, what does? Tune in to this podcast to learn a new approach. In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them t... In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them to do.<br /> <br /> In this episode, Judy and her guest, Tara Gregor, founder and CEO of Breakwell, a resource hub for holistic wellness discuss a very different and highly effective approach to motivation. Old models and external motivation tactics simply don't work anymore. So, if those don't work, what does? Tune in to this podcast to learn a new approach. Judy Ryan clean 1:04:12 Episode 8 – If Not Punishment, Then What? https://www.lifeworksystems.com/008-if-not-punishment-then-what-redirecting-negative-behavior/ Mon, 01 Jun 2020 14:00:44 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11535 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/008-if-not-punishment-then-what-redirecting-negative-behavior/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/008-if-not-punishment-then-what-redirecting-negative-behavior/feed/ 0 “It always seems impossible until it’s been done.”  Nelson Mandela “An insight the size of a mustard seed is powerful enough to bring down a mountain-sized illusion that may be holding our lives together. Truth strikes without mercy. We fear our intuitions because we fear the transformational power within our revelations.” Caroline Myss, Author, Mystic Overview: Today’s episode is called If Not Punishment, Then What? Redirecting Negative Behavior. In it, I will be talking with you about negative behavior, what causes it, how we typically react to it and more productive ways we could respond in the face of it. And while negative behavior includes conflict, it includes much more than conflict too. This is a rich topic and today will be something of an overview with several additional episodes on this topic in the near future. Questions to Ponder: Why do people misbehave? What makes it difficult to recognize certain types of misbehavior? What have we been taught are appropriate reactions to misbehavior? What are some better ways to respond instead? In other words what is Redirecting Negative Behavior? Episode Guest: Christen Schweizer Christen Schweizer has been the Manager of Application Development at Esse Health for almost 7 years. She provides expertise on the evaluation and design of information systems, is responsible for ongoing testing of software and change management, leads the Application Development team and helps them upgrade processes with proven results. She partners with teams for cross functional support and to improve processes. She supervises and resolves all open issues with software vendors. She manages teams that create systems for multiple industry projects and oversees customer service. She is a key player in the integration of the workplace culture model from LifeWork Systems, which supports her skills to increase trust, camaraderie, and consensus for greater efficiency and success. Christen is also the mother of 4 children. I met Christen about 4 years ago when I brought my culture transformation process to Esse Health, one of the largest physician-owned healthcare organizations with over 1000 employees. When we first met, she told me she had already been studying an Adlerian psychology approach to improve her parenting skills at home. She was happy to have this reinforced at work. Christen not only has embraced the LifeWork Systems culture transformation process, she has since become a subject matter expert on the process and helps to onboard new employees. Christen is uniquely qualified to speak on many topics but none more than Redirecting Negative Behavior. Not only does Christen learn from LifeWork Systems, we learn from Christen as she is an avid seeker and learner who refers me to books and articles and video clips that align with our work. In fact, she recently sent me a clip of the Lego movie that reflects a great example of redirecting negative behavior. I’m honored and excited to welcome her to our show – Welcome Christen Schweizer. I’m so happy to have you on my podcast! Keywords: redirecting negative behavior, Adlerian psychology,  Episode Topics: Assertions About Negative Behavior Definition of Redirecting Negative Behavior Disengagement Statistics Personal Responsibility Adler's 5 Major Precepts Assertions About Negative Behavior Negative behavior is epidemic – it’s everywhere Two ineffective philosophies – permissive and punitive Four ineffective models - control All behaviors reflect unconscious beliefs and intentions – it’s purposeful (5 goals) All behaving people are discouraged. (most does not look discouraged) Our response has a profound and significant impact – train story Definition of Redirecting Negative Behavior Redirect is a: Technique to stop a cycle of limited thinking/behaving based in discouragement and fear Method for diagnosing and treating the true causes of negative beh... “It always seems impossible until it’s been done.”  Nelson Mandela “An insight the size of a mustard seed is powerful enough to bring down a mountain-sized illusion that may be holding our lives together. Truth strikes without mercy. In this episode, Judy and her guest, Christen Schweizer, Manager of Application Development at Esse Health discuss Redirecting Negative Behavior. What is negative behavior, what causes it, how do we typically react to it, and what are more productive ways we could respond in the face of it. While negative behavior includes conflict, it includes much more than conflict. This is a rich topic and this episode is something of an overview -- with several additional episodes on this topic in the near future. Judy Ryan clean 51:11 Episode 7 – Game Changing Appreciative Inquiry https://www.lifeworksystems.com/007-game-changing-appreciative-inquiry/ Fri, 15 May 2020 14:00:49 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11529 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/007-game-changing-appreciative-inquiry/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/007-game-changing-appreciative-inquiry/feed/ 0 “We must become the change we wish to see in the world.” Ghandi “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” Albert Einstein Overview: In all my past podcast episodes, the bottom line in what I share is that I’m describing conditions and conversations needed for the success of individuals and groups. This is culture at its most foundational. Such conditions and conversations either help people feel encouraged and support them to gain courage, to grow and to participate in their life and in their work or they don’t. Now is a time where it’s evident how strong or weak this is within people. Too many people are suffering in inferiority complex, failing to experience the 4 core needs to feel empowered, lovable, connected and contributing and unable to take responsibility for what they think and say and do. They have an under-developed ability to motivate themselves from the inside out and to build the types of relationships with themselves and others that feed needs for courage and forward movement, despite circumstances. There is no better time to showcase the particular tool and concept of appreciative inquiry. The work I do is designed to provide specific support systems in which people ultimately are enabled to handle whatever life throws at them. Right now, the major stressor of the day is the Covid19 pandemic with all of its challenges. But before, during and after it, ongoing stressors include ever faster speed of change, complexity, globalization and new technologies to name just a few. In fact, in my work, I’m often involved in stress-producing situations like changes in leadership, unresolved and persistent negative behaviors, rapid growth, mergers, acquisitions; anything that creates uncertainty and fear. That’s because when stressors occur, that’s when we can see the strength or weaknesses organizationally and individually.  In the vast majority of people uncertainty and fear result in catastrophizing; a coping mechanism most people turn to because they believe it will help them to survive what’s happening. And this takes a major toll on us and slows us down. That’s why I’m bringing this particular topic to you today. Questions to Ponder: What is appreciative inquiry? Why does it matter? And how does it work in actual real-world situations? Appreciative inquiry is a powerful and often unknown communication tool that forces our minds out of catastrophizing and into possibility thinking that mobilizes us so we rally to be part of a solution and that helps us have hope as individuals and as groups. Episode Guest: Lisa Dean Lisa Dean is a project manager at Esse Health and works in the software development area. In her role, Lisa is responsible for daily planning, scheduling and controlling the project deliverables, while building and maintaining working relationships with internal associates and the team of client contacts. She is accountable for meeting project timelines and results for customer satisfaction and must effectively communicate project goals, objectives and priorities. She works closely with 3rd party vendors and communicates daily progress of accounts to Management. Keywords:  appreciative inquiry, 4-D Model, traditional problem-solving vs. appreciative inquiry Story: The Bowling Team Story. There were two bowling teams, and they were both videotaped. The first team’s video was edited so that it only showed their bad, weak, bowling moves. The other team’s video was edited so that it only showed their strong, correct, bowling moves. Both teams watched the videos for the purpose of improving their games. Which bowling team was able to improve its bowling game: the team that focused on its mistakes or the team that focused on its successes? The team that watched its mistakes collectively improved by 30% (not bad huh?!) The team that watched its strengths collectively imp... “We must become the change we wish to see in the world.” Ghandi “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” Albert Einstein - Overview: - Join Judy and her guest, Lisa Dean from Esse Health, as they discuss a powerful and often unknown communication tool called Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry is asking questions that are appreciative in nature in order to cause intentional outcomes. Using an Appreciative Inquiry approach, managers and peers help themselves and team members refocus their thinking from catastrophizing to possibility thinking. And, that shift helps organizations rally to be part of solutions that result in hope as individuals and as groups. Judy Ryan clean 44:56 Episode 6 – When Everything Falls To Pieces https://www.lifeworksystems.com/006-when-everything-falls-to-pieces/ Fri, 01 May 2020 21:21:00 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11525 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/006-when-everything-falls-to-pieces/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/006-when-everything-falls-to-pieces/feed/ 0 “In general, only a child who feels safe dares to grow forward healthily. His safety needs must be gratified. He can’t be pushed ahead, because the ungratified safety needs will remain forever underground, always calling for satisfaction.” Abraham Maslow Overview: In my recent podcast episodes, I shared the importance of certain conditions and conversations that keep people out of what Adler called the inferiority complex and the resulting uninterrupted struggles within and between people. I shared how we need to help one another build courage and motivation from the inside out. I shared why the fostering of personal responsibility, social interest and emotional intelligence on a regular basis and for everyone, without exception, is crucial. Consistency and breaking down outdated imbalances of power are key to creating further experiences that support healing and regeneration on every level, especially as we go through traumatic circumstances. Questions to Ponder: What does trauma-informed mean and why is it important to consider especially in recent times and as we move into the future? What is the power distance index and how does this fit into our discussion on creating trauma-informed, supportive conditions? What exactly are technohuman ecosystems and why should we be excited to understand and embrace them? Episode Guest: Jacob Perkins Jacob Perkins is an empathizing and systemizing transdisciplinary practitioner with over a decade serving across human service systems. He has an eclectic background, including an MSW from Washington University in St. Louis and training and research in clinical practice, transdisciplinary science, and globalization. You can find him serving passionately in the Emergency Room, advising emerging practitioners, conducting health research, or pro bono project consulting. Featured Story: I had a email from one of my clients the other day that really illustrated this. It was from the COO of a large local healthcare company, who shared an email she sent to her entire team observing the many ways they are rocking the teamwork during Covid19. She shared with me this is happening so extraordinarily because for the past three years, together they have built a highly trauma-informed workplace culture and instituted a technohuman ecosystem, not only with each other but in their technology roles within this 1500 person fast-growing healthcare company. Keywords: power distance index, trauma-informed, technohuman ecosystems, psychological safety, neuro-diversity In this episode, we focused on: Power distance index - PDI is a measurement of the acceptance of a hierarchy of power by individuals who make up the general population of a nation, culture, or business. What was discovered is that fear of questioning or being assertive and open with the captain and in some instances with those manning the control tower, was perceived to be insubordination and to be avoided. Trauma-informed - Understanding and consideration of the pervasive nature of trauma and promotes environments of healing and recovery rather than practices and services that may inadvertently re-traumatize. Psychological safety - is being able to show and behave as one's self without fear of negative consequences of self-image, status or career. Technohuman ecosystems - In this podcast, it's the collaboration of human activities enhanced by some degree of technology. Neuro-diversity - variation in the human brain regarding sociability, learning, attention, mood and other mental functions in a non-pathological sense. An example would be to learn of the specialized functioning of certain autistic workers in bringing strengths and unique ways of determining answers through non-conventional neurology. Five requirements for a high-functioning trauma-informed culture, including: Safety, creating spaces where people feel culturally, emotionally, and physically safe, “In general, only a child who feels safe dares to grow forward healthily. His safety needs must be gratified. He can’t be pushed ahead, because the ungratified safety needs will remain forever underground, always calling for satisfaction.” Wondering how to keep it all together when everything appears to be falling apart around you? Recorded during the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, Judy and her guest, Jacob Perkins, discuss how to manage yourself and your team when times are challenging and uncertain. Judy and Jacob discuss why the fostering of personal responsibility, social interest, and emotional intelligence on a regular basis and for everyone, without exception, is crucial. Consistency and breaking down outdated imbalances of power are key to creating further experiences that support healing and regeneration on every level, especially as we go through traumatic circumstances. Judy Ryan clean 45:19 Episode 5 – The Power of Mentoring https://www.lifeworksystems.com/005-the-power-of-mentoring/ Wed, 15 Apr 2020 11:00:51 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11342 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/005-the-power-of-mentoring/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/005-the-power-of-mentoring/feed/ 0 Quotes: “The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.” ― Steven Spielberg   “Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.” ― Plato   “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.” ― Plutarch Overview: Mentoring is consistent, solo support, combined with appreciation and Socratic questions on culture and emotional intelligence practices, allows a person to expand and grow. Each one feels empowered by direct attention, verbal recognition of one’s gifts and contributions, an invitation to remember and live a purposeful life and from questions that move them forward into meaningful progress. In this episode, I cover the purposes, processes and pitfalls of mentoring sessions as recommended by LifeWork Systems. Coaching, counseling and advising involve information being shared by a more knowledgeable person to a less knowledgeable person. Therapy is listening to emotionally support the sender and help them connect dots (often to their childhood) as a the priority. Mentoring is allowing people to take a variety of concepts and tools and through a series of questions, discover ways they might apply them to overcoming life and work challenges and achieving life and work goals. Questions to Ponder: What is mentoring? Is it really necessary? Why? What is the purpose of it? What is the healthiest type of it? How often should it happen? How does mentoring differ from coaching, counseling, advising, or therapy? Why do we jump to rescue and enable people rather than assist them in developing task ownership and intrinsic motivation? Why do we continue to say what people have already heard and already know? Episode Guest: Mike Minkler Mike Minkler is President of CMIT Solutions. CMIT works with small business owners to help them understand how they use technology. His company delivers peace of mind to business owners through proactive, predictable technology support. CMIT is a provider of flat-fee Managed Services to small and medium sized businesses. They advise clients on addressing security concerns related to computers and technology, provide solutions that enable the evolving mobile workforce, provide backup and disaster recovery solutions to protect valuable assets and a variety of other services including cloud computing. From my experiences with Mike, he is a powerful and innovative leader, eager to learn and develop new skills within himself and to empower his staff in the same. He functions from purpose and values and invests time and money into maintaining, measuring and improving his healthy workplace culture and strong interpersonal and trustworthy relationships with his employees and co-owners. Keywords:  mentoring, human system, employee engagement, purpose-driven Story: Some of the stories at CMIT Solutions, including some experiences and questions from years of mentoring. Episode Topics: Review of last episodes: In the first 4 podcasts, I focused on these themes: developing people instead of controlling them. I referred to this as transfer of responsibility to people so they pick up task ownership; the owning of tasks like managing one’s own relationships, productivity, engagement, mastery of emotional intelligence tools, and moving forward in developing a blueprint progress plan. not only task ownership but trustworthiness as a foundation for the culture and social interest as a key value. Social interest is caring about using one’s power to cause specific, intentional consequences to others. Mentoring is also directly in support of emotional intelligence such as self- and social- awareness, and self- and social- management. In this episode, we focused on: Quotes: - “The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.” ― Steven Spielberg -   - “Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it ... Looking for a powerful way to empower and maximize the productivity of your team? A team member mentoring process may be just the thing. <br /> <br /> In this episode, Judy and her guest, Mike Minkler, president of CMIT Solutions, discuss what it is, how it works, how it differs from other empowerment methodologies, and how CMIT has implemented this approach in their organization. Join Judy and Mike as they discuss CMIT’s experience, results, and pitfalls they encountered as they implemented the mentoring process as recommended by LifeWork Systems. <br /> Judy Ryan 5 clean 48:36 Episode 4 – How Can I Motivate Them? https://www.lifeworksystems.com/how-can-i-motivate-them-2/ Wed, 01 Apr 2020 11:00:57 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11333 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/how-can-i-motivate-them-2/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/how-can-i-motivate-them-2/feed/ 0 In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them to do. In this episode, Judy and her guest, Tara Gregor, founder and CEO of Breakwell, a resource hub for holistic wellness discuss a very different and highly effective approach to motivation. Old models and external motivation tactics simply don't work anymore. So, if those don't work, what does? Tune in to this podcast to learn a new approach. In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them t... In my work with clients, I often hear people say, “how can I motivate this person to do what they’re supposed to? They’re lazy. They’re unmotivated.” The truth is people are always motivated. They’re just not always motivated to do what YOU want them to do.<br /> <br /> In this episode, Judy and her guest, Tara Gregor, founder and CEO of Breakwell, a resource hub for holistic wellness discuss a very different and highly effective approach to motivation. Old models and external motivation tactics simply don't work anymore. So, if those don't work, what does? Tune in to this podcast to learn a new approach. Judy Ryan clean 54:03 Episode 3 – The New Culture Model https://www.lifeworksystems.com/003-the-new-culture-model/ Sun, 15 Mar 2020 11:00:53 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11328 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/003-the-new-culture-model/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/003-the-new-culture-model/feed/ 0 In this episode, Judy and her guest, Lynn Dornfeld, dig a little deeper into the new culture model from several different angles. What are the components to follow?  What are the success criteria?  What is a culture framework and why do you need one? In this episode, Judy and her guest, Lynn Dornfeld, dig a little deeper into the new culture model from several different angles. What are the components to follow?  What are the success criteria?  What is a culture framework and why do you need one? In this episode, Judy and her guest, Lynn Dornfeld, dig a little deeper into the new culture model from several different angles. What are the components to follow?  What are the success criteria?  What is a culture framework and why do you need one? Judy Ryan clean 53:57 Episode 2 – Are You a Puppet Or Powerful? https://www.lifeworksystems.com/002-are-you-a-puppet-or-powerful/ Sun, 01 Mar 2020 12:00:58 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11322 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/002-are-you-a-puppet-or-powerful/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/002-are-you-a-puppet-or-powerful/feed/ 0 Episode Title:  Are you a puppet or powerful? Overview: This topic is about understanding the success criteria for living from purpose and values and helping people with personal responsibility and task ownership; what they must get competent in, to live fulfilling, meaningful lives. Questions to Ponder: Why do so many people settle for manipulating others rather than developing them? What beliefs and consequences do we need to consider for both? What’s the alternative? What is a healthy culture? What does it mean to be responsibility-based as an individual and to create a responsibility-based culture? Episode Guest: Gabriela Ramirez Arellano  Gabriela Ramirez Arellano is is a Business Strategist for the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Metro St. Louis. She is a consultant to Hispanic owned businesses, delivering value to these businesses by providing strategic guidance, advice and support in an effort to increase their economic power and reach in their respective communities. Gabriela is also a wife, mother and co-owns Don Emiliano's, with her husband, a restaurant in O'Fallon, Missouri. Keywords:  Individual psychology, responsibility-based culture, Teal culture, agility, personal responsibility, social interest Story: Three generations of women in a family all cut off the ends of their roast and throw them away only to come to find out that this was done decades ago so the roast would fit in th pan. This story demonstrates that we can become stuck in an existing way of functioning without questioning the value of the practices today. Episode Topics Review of last episode: control models, inferiority complex, emotional intelligence competencies, there's no 'good old days', the change process. In this episode, we focus on: Autonomy, alignment and ownership of personal power and responsibility Power within Co-dependency - being in other people's yards Self-determining and subjective private logic Responsibility-based culture is NOT permissive Teal organizational model Autonomy, alignment and ownership of personal power and responsibility: holding a positive belief about people and helping them to trust themselves and take responsibility for managing themselves. Gabriela shares how being asked what she wants was a revolution to her. Power within: Power-within is not always understood. For example, it may not look really strong looking. It might mean slowing down and taking time to consider things fully. Our power is that wise voice within. We always have choices. Co-dependency - being in other people's yards: We don't know how to stay out of other people's business and minding what's ours. Self-determining and subjective private logic: We are always making our own subjective interpretations about what we see and experience. We sometimes subjugate our own ideas because we believe it's safer and appropriate to agree with others about how life should work and who we should be. We must come to see that our thinking is malleable and our relationships are not as fragile as we think. A responsibility-based culture is NOT permissive: To create a responsibility-based community requires you: have high character, high intention, high love, a positive ego, commitment to determination for developing self and others hold high belief in people transfer responsibility to people in a supportive way so they can pick up responsibilities that are theirs and own their many tasks mentor and be mentored using Socratic questions and referencing the model tools and concepts be mutual with people with respect and equality consider what we see is a reflection of our belief systems or current level of discouragement or encouragement; we don't all see things the same way care about being in service and noticing what we cause others by our choices (self-focus and self-fulfillment vs. service to all) trust people faster, Episode Title:  Are you a puppet or powerful? - Overview: This topic is about understanding the success criteria for living from purpose and values and helping people with personal responsibility and task ownership; what they must get competent in, In this episode, Judy and her guest, Gabriella Ramirez-Arellano, explore success criteria required for living from purpose and values. They discuss personal responsibility and task ownership; those things in which they must become competent in order to live fulfilling, meaningful lives. Judy Ryan clean 47:18 Episode 1- Spitting in the Soup https://www.lifeworksystems.com/001-spitting-in-the-soup/ Sat, 01 Feb 2020 12:00:44 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11138 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/001-spitting-in-the-soup/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/001-spitting-in-the-soup/feed/ 0 This topic is designed to challenge basic norms we’ve held sacrosanct for centuries. These are the four control models described in this episode as widely promoted means to cultivate good citizenship in homes, schools, churches, and workplaces; really everywhere. This episode helps listeners to recognize these as the impediments they are and that they need to be dismantled and replaced with new models. This topic is designed to challenge basic norms we’ve held sacrosanct for centuries. These are the four control models described in this episode as widely promoted means to cultivate good citizenship in homes, schools, churches, This topic is designed to challenge basic norms we’ve held sacrosanct for centuries. These are the four control models described in this episode as widely promoted means to cultivate good citizenship in homes, schools, churches, and workplaces; really everywhere. This episode helps listeners to recognize these as the impediments they are and that they need to be dismantled and replaced with new models. Judy Ryan clean 48:22 Spitting In The Soup https://www.lifeworksystems.com/spitting-in-the-soup/ Fri, 17 Jan 2020 20:20:37 +0000 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/?p=11056 https://www.lifeworksystems.com/spitting-in-the-soup/#respond https://www.lifeworksystems.com/spitting-in-the-soup/feed/ 0 People are always motivated. It’s not anyone’s job to motivate others. People can control themselves. They can do what’s right and don’t need approval or shaming to do so. They don’t need to be enabled. The problem is we don’t have faith in people nor do we know how to effectively teach them to pick up responsibility for things that are theirs to own. When we learn to do so, others can become accountable, caring and fully engaged, making a positive difference in your business. People are always motivated. It’s not anyone’s job to motivate others. People can control themselves. They can do what’s right and don’t need approval or shaming to do so. They don’t need to be enabled. The problem is we don’t have faith in people nor ... People are always motivated. It’s not anyone’s job to motivate others. People can control themselves. They can do what’s right and don’t need approval or shaming to do so. They don’t need to be enabled. The problem is we don’t have faith in people nor do we know how to effectively teach them to pick up responsibility for things that are theirs to own. When we learn to do so, others can become accountable, caring and fully engaged, making a positive difference in your business. Judy Ryan clean 49:09 Help! I Dread Work and I’m the Boss! https://www.lifeworksystems.com/help-i-dread-work-and-im-the-boss/ Sun, 01 Nov 2015 19:33:52 +0000 https://dbc.lifeworksystems.com/?p=2638 Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. Abraham Lincoln   The leadership style that starts in childhood is at the heart of why 55% of people are disengaged and 16% are actively disengaged. What do you need and want in order to enjoy a successful, thriving business? Most of all, you need employees who are proactive, creative and personally responsible regardless of who’s observing. You need people of character, who use their power in service. So…how do you accomplish this when 71% of the American workforce is predominately disengaged?   55% of the workforce is regularly doing mediocre work delivered with resentful compliance (“Ugh, it’s Monday and I have to go to work”) proven to bring no additional revenues to their company.   16% are actively rebelling and resisting cooperation (“No I won’t and you can’t make me!”), sabotaging people and projects and costing companies a documented $16,000 a year according to a Gallup survey of 700,000 U.S. Workers. Why? The origins are in family, educational and corporate cultures we still uphold despite new priorities and information.   Up until recently, the vast majority of parents, educators and employers believed it their duty to provide all rules and incentives as well as dictate and motivate “appropriate” thoughts, emotional reactions and behaviors of those they lead. Our workplaces, originally designed to control employees, still mirror our educational systems designed to cultivate conforming, conventional, and compliant factory workers; maintaining a culture in which a few managers at the top externally motivate people.   As a result, many children became adults who learned to reluctantly bend to expectations of their authority figures, behaving like victims, while others reacted by rebelling and resisting; all costly choices, as Gallup data illustrates. You may be like most business owners who realize that in order to nurture and encourage the kind of people you need, you must re-evaluate your management styles and change your culture. You may be wondering, “How do I make necessary changes and still run my business?”   In Michael Gerber’s book The E-Myth, he asserts business owners must take time to “work on their business, not just in their business.” You may agree with this conceptually but believe yourself inadequate to the task of developing systems needed to implement healthy culture change affordably, efficiently and effectively.   Transformation of your culture occurs when social interest and intrinsic motivation are cultivated. When people learn how to be trustworthy, align their actions with meaningful purposes and shift from passive compliance to proactive self-management, real positive change occurs. Your primary task is one in which managing, motivating and evaluating employees, is replaced by effective transfer of responsibility to them as a top priority. In my work with clients, I have successfully provided the structure and systems needed to make this an easy, profitable transition. But first, you must determine your readiness and then understand the necessary steps to succeed.   Key questions to determine your readiness Am I committed to partnering with my staff and cultivating leadership in each and every employee? Is a responsibility-based culture a high enough priority to ensure I devote sufficient time and resources to bring it about? Will I give others ample opportunities to think about and discuss ideas? Solutions? Am I prepared to share power? Control? Make emotional and social intelligence and trust-building priority? Am I committed to the ongoing personal growth and development I need to be effective in my new role?   Your Long-range steps Make sure you and your leadership team support the transformation process. You provide understanding and gain commitment from your Sr. Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. Abraham Lincoln   The leadership style that starts in childhood is at the heart of why 55% of people are disengaged and 16% are actively disengage...
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power.
Abraham Lincoln




 
The leadership style that starts in childhood is at the heart of why 55% of people are disengaged and 16% are actively disengaged. What do you need and want in order to enjoy a successful, thriving business? Most of all, you need employees who are proactive, creative and personally responsible regardless of who’s observing. You need people of character, who use their power in service. So…how do you accomplish this when 71% of the American workforce is predominately disengaged?



 
55% of the workforce is regularly doing mediocre work delivered with resentful compliance (“Ugh, it’s Monday and I have to go to work”) proven to bring no additional revenues to their company.



 
16% are actively rebelling and resisting cooperation (“No I won’t and you can’t make me!”), sabotaging people and projects and costing companies a documented $16,000 a year according to a Gallup survey of 700,000 U.S. Workers. Why? The origins are in family, educational and corporate cultures we still uphold despite new priorities and information.



 
Up until recently, the vast majority of parents, educators and employers believed it their duty to provide all rules and incentives as well as dictate and motivate “appropriate” thoughts, emotional reactions and behaviors of those they lead. Our workplaces, originally designed to control employees, still mirror our educational systems designed to cultivate conforming, conventional, and compliant factory workers; maintaining a culture in which a few managers at the top externally motivate people.



 
As a result, many children became adults who learned to reluctantly bend to expectations of their authority figures, behaving like victims, while others reacted by rebelling and resisting; all costly choices, as Gallup data illustrates. You may be like most business owners who realize that in order to nurture and encourage the kind of people you need, you must re-evaluate your management styles and change your culture. You may be wondering, “How do I make necessary changes and still run my business?”



 
In Michael Gerber’s book The E-Myth, he asserts business owners must take time to “work on their business, not just in their business.” You may agree with this conceptually but believe yourself inadequate to the task of developing systems needed to implement healthy culture change affordably, efficiently and effectively.



 
Transformation of your culture occurs when social interest and intrinsic motivation are cultivated. When people learn how to be trustworthy, align their actions with meaningful purposes and shift from passive compliance to proactive self-management, real positive change occurs. Your primary task is one in which managing, motivating and evaluating employees, is replaced by effective transfer of responsibility to them as a top priority. In my work with clients, I have successfully provided the structure and systems needed to make this an easy, profitable transition. But first, you must determine your readiness and then understand the necessary steps to succeed.



 
Key questions to determine your readiness




* Am I committed to partnering with my staff and cultivating leadership in each and every employee?
* Is a responsibility-based culture a high enough priority to ensure I devote sufficient time and resources to bring it about?
* Will I give others ample opportunities to think about and discuss ideas? Solutions?
* Am I prepared to share power? Control?]]>
Judy Ryan